Tuesday, 31 March 2015

Deleting Media From Google Photos

What You Need To Know When Deleting Media From Google Photos

Delete Photos
With Google kindly offering us unlimited photo storage, there may be no reason to worry about saving space and deleting your photos – but you still may want to.
Your albums may have duplicates, old photos or simply memories you prefer to get rid of.
Whatever the case is, here’s what you should know before going ahead with deleting photos in Google Photos.The key thing to remember is that Google Photos is a cloud service. Thus, every action you perform in Google Photos will be copied across all your devices connected to the cloud. So, if you delete a photo in Google Photos app, it will also be removed from every device that you have associated with your Google Photos account. Moreover, the photo will also disappear fro all the collages and other creations you have used it in.
A deleted photo on the cloud is deleted across ALL connected devices
The key thing to remember is that Google Photos is a cloud service. Thus, every action you perform in Google Photos will be copied across all your devices connected to the cloud. So, if you delete a photo in Google Photos app, it will also be removed from every device that you have associated with your Google Photos account. Moreover, the photo will also disappear fro all the collages and other creations you have used it in.
Read the warnings
Of course, before the action is performed, you will see a pop-up, warning you as to the consequences of you actions, but it’s easy to ignore it without really reading into the contents.
The pop-up will also warn you that you that, in addition to being deleted from all your connected devices, the photo you are about to remove, will also be removed from where you have shared it on Google +. That means that every photo you intended for sharing on the network will need to have a permanent place in Google Photos.
If you have already deleted a photo
If you have come across this blog post “too little too late” and have already deleted a few photos from the cloud that you would actually like to keep on your devices – no worries. Google has foreseen the situation and decided to grant you 60 whole days to travel back to the past and undo the action, restoring your deleted photos.
You can make that happen directly from the app. Just go to “Trash”, select the items you want to get back and click on the arrow in the top right corner. In a matter of seconds, you will see the photos back in the appropriate album, where they belong. The same will happen across all your devices connected to the cloud.
However, once you remove your photos from “Trash” (by hitting the “empty trash” button), the photos will be gone forever with no magical options of bringing them back.

Thursday, 26 March 2015

Google Photos Library

Get Started With Your Google Photos Library

Google Photos
With unlimited storage on offer it’s hard not to get excited about Google Photos. But before you get your selfie stick out or start chasing cute animals in the park, let’s get the basics done. It’s time to set up your Google Photos Library.
If you have been using Google+ as your automatic mobile backup, your photo library may already be looking pretty sleek. However, there is a good chance that wasn’t the case. If you are just getting started with Google Photos, here’s how to go about the task.
The first thing you’ll need to do is install Google desktop uploader that will help you get all your photo library set up in one big swoop.
To find the right desktop uploader, head over to photos.google.com/apps.
If you don’t yet have an account in Photos, you will need to go through a simple sing-up process – but don’t worry, it will only take a few minutes.
On the left, you will see the uploader button and, upon tapping on it, the necessary file will be downloaded. You won’t have to worry about compatibility as the system will detect whether you are running Mac OS X or Windows and choose the file accordingly.
Once the file is on your computer, install the app and sign into your Google Account.
Now comes the time for a few decisions to be made. You will need to determine which folders and devices the app will be scanning to back up photos, as well as the quality you’d like them to be uploaded in. You can choose to check or uncheck folders that you want backed up, as well as add other folders – for instance those on an external hard drive.
When it comes to the choice of quality, note that “High Quality” is set at 16MP and you get UNLIMITED storage. “Original” mode will upload your photos in full just the way they are, in case you ever want to download them again unchanged.
Uploading photos in “original” will start taking up your Google Drive space – of which you only gave 15GB for free. After you reach the limit, you will have to be paying $1.99 per month for 100GB or $9.99 for 1TB. Thus, your quest for “originality” may end up costing you quite a lot.
Once you have thought this through and made your decisions, go ahead and press “Start Backup”.
The process may take some time, depending on how many photos you are uploading, your Internet speed and connection stability, and you can refer to the menu bar to check the progress.
If you feel that the backup is taking too long and you need to get going, you can always pause the process and come back to it when time allows.
Note: after arranging this setup and while you have Google Drive desktop application, your photos will be duplicated to “Google Photos” folder on your computer. You can turn off the syncing in Google Drive desktop app.